Reforming our prisons – consultation

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Last week’s damning report from the Chief Inspector of Probation makes it clear. We need a radically new approach to rehabilitation.

The primary purpose of our penal system should be to prevent crime by rehabilitating offenders. Right now, it’s failing.

Prisons are overcrowded and understaffed. Violence, riots, drug use, self-harm and suicide are all far too common.

Resettlement services and supervision for those leaving prison are woefully inadequate. Community Rehabilitation Company contracts are so underfunded and mismanaged that the Government has had to end them early.

And a lack of services – in prison and in the community – means that many former offenders are not able to find work. Worse, the financial support they receive is often not enough to cover even basic necessities. Far too many of them are homeless when they get out of prison.

As a result, re-offending rates are far too high. Half of those who leave prison re-offend within a year. Estimates pin the cost of this to our country at around £10 billion a year.

The Liberal Democrats demand better. That’s why we’ve drawn up proposals to transform the criminal justice system and make it far more effective at tackling re-offending.

At our Spring Conference in York, we launched a new consultation paper on plans to:

  • Significantly reduce the prison population, which is currently the largest in Western Europe. This will include greater use of tough, effective community sentences.
  • Radically transform prisons themselves. We’ll build rehabilitation and recovery into their design, improve conditions and allow more time for purposeful activities.
  • Establish a new, holistic approach to rehabilitation. We’ll give local co-ordinating bodies responsibility for supporting offenders to build a life free from crime.
  • Properly invest in rehabilitation, setting the costs of prisons, supervision and services against the huge societal and financial benefits of reducing reoffending. Less crime means fewer victims of crime, fewer people in prison, and more people in work.

This is just the beginning of the process of developing new policy on rehabilitation. Over the coming months, we’ll be consulting with experts and organisations in every part of the penal system.

But we also want to hear from you. Would you like to play a part in shaping our new policy? Read the paper below and email your responses to Mike German (mike.german@libdems.org.uk) by Friday 3 May 2019.

Read more now

Reforming our prisons and probation – consultation

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Last week’s damning report from the Chief Inspector of Probation makes it clear. We need a radically new approach to rehabilitation.

The primary purpose of our penal system should be to prevent crime by rehabilitating offenders. Right now, it’s failing.

Prisons are overcrowded and understaffed. Violence, riots, drug use, self-harm and suicide are all far too common.

Resettlement services and supervision for those leaving prison are woefully inadequate. Community Rehabilitation Company contracts are so underfunded and mismanaged that the Government has had to end them early.

And a lack of services – in prison and in the community – means that many former offenders are not able to find work. Worse, the financial support they receive is often not enough to cover even basic necessities. Far too many of them are homeless when they get out of prison.

As a result, re-offending rates are far too high. Half of those who leave prison re-offend within a year. Estimates pin the cost of this to our country at around £10 billion a year.

The Liberal Democrats demand better. That’s why we’ve drawn up proposals to transform the criminal justice system and make it far more effective at tackling re-offending.

At our Spring Conference in York, we launched a new consultation paper on plans to:

  • Significantly reduce the prison population, which is currently the largest in Western Europe. This will include greater use of tough, effective community sentences.
  • Radically transform prisons themselves. We’ll build rehabilitation and recovery into their design, improve conditions and allow more time for purposeful activities.
  • Establish a new, holistic approach to rehabilitation. We’ll give local co-ordinating bodies responsibility for supporting offenders to build a life free from crime.
  • Properly invest in rehabilitation, setting the costs of prisons, supervision and services against the huge societal and financial benefits of reducing reoffending. Less crime means fewer victims of crime, fewer people in prison, and more people in work.

This is just the beginning of the process of developing new policy on rehabilitation. Over the coming months, we’ll be consulting with experts and organisations in every part of the penal system.

But we also want to hear from you. Would you like to play a part in shaping our new policy? Read the paper below and email your responses to Mike German (mike.german@libdems.org.uk) by Friday 3 May 2019.

Read more now

Happy not-Brexit day!

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Nigel Farage must be fuming.

Today was supposed to be his day of victory, but it’s a damp squib. Thanks to almost 3 years of Lib Dems fighting, we’re closer than ever to a People’s Vote.

And we’re not stopping there – we have the momentum.

We’ve come an incredibly long way.

Tim Farron’s was a lone voice when he said the people must be given the final say on Brexit.

Remain voters thought Brexit was a done deal.

And Jeremy Corbyn was demanding that Article 50 be triggered immediately.

27 Labour MPs broke the whip and voted against a People’s Vote on Wednesday night. If they hadn’t, it would have had a majority.

So it was left to us to lead the way forward. We knew that people had no voted for a specific Brexit – and they deserved the final say once a deal had been negotiated. What started with democracy must end with democracy. The referendum result was a departure and not a destination.

Under Vince, we have continued to lead this fight, demanding better than Brexit every step of the way.

Look just how far we’ve come.

We’ve defeated Theresa May’s extreme Brexit plan by the biggest margins in Parliamentary history. Three times.

We’ve ruled out crashing out of the EU today.

And polls show we’ve brought the people with us – a clear majority now want a People’s Vote.

And they want it badly.

Over a million of us marched through London last weekend calling for a people’s vote.

And on Wednesday night, more MPs supported a People’s Vote than any other option.

In short, we’ve never been closer to ensuring people – not politicians – get the final word on Brexit.

This hasn’t happened by accident.

We’ve spoken with more than a million people on the doorstep and contacted millions more with our leaflets and letters.

We have reached more than 5 million people online through our digital advertising campaign.

What started with democracy must end with democracy.

We have welcomed a staggering 260,000 people who have signed up to support our campaign.

And we’ve marched seven times at national anti-Brexit marches in London and many more times in other parts of Britain.

That we’re closer than ever to stopping Brexit is in no small part down to us. To you.

And what have the other parties done?

Theresa May’s Tories have made an absolute hash of Brexit.

And she’s been allowed to. Why? Because Jeremy Corbyn has aided and abetted her every step of the way.

27 Labour MPs broke the whip and voted against a People’s Vote on Wednesday night. If they hadn’t, it would have had a majority.

But we know it’s worse than that. Jeremy Corbyn has never been interested in Remain. He is less than lukewarm about his own party’s policies. Where was he when over a million people marched in London to demand a People’s Vote? If Brexit gets through, it’ll hit society’s most vulnerable the hardest. And it’ll be thanks to him.

But the Liberal Democrats haven’t abandoned vulnerable people. We haven’t abandoned fellow remainers. We never will.

I am so proud at how far we have come.

There is a long way to go, and we have more fights ahead of us.

But right now, I want to savour this moment.

It is March 29th, and Britain is in the EU. We continue to stand with our European neighbours, EU citizens in the UK, and we continue to be European.

Tomorrow, the fight for Remain continues.

And I can’t think of anyone else I’d rather be fighting with.

Celebrating 5 years of same-sex marriage

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Most people meet and get married within a few years, but not us. We got married on our twentieth anniversary. We had to wait 20 years before we could tie the knot, not because we didn’t want to, but because to do so before 2014 would have been unlawful.

Throughout the years the LGBT community has been marginalised, demonised and ignored

The first same-sex marriages took place 5 years ago today, opening marriage to people irrespective of whether they fall in love with someone of the same sex or opposite sex. Like us, many same-sex couples had to wait years for this change, and it was a hard-won right that came as a result of years of protesting and campaigning.

Throughout the years the LGBT community has been marginalised, demonised and ignored but we are proud to be part of a party that has never shied away from speaking up for what is just and right.

In the 1980s the Liberal Democrats were the first party to openly oppose Section 28 – an act which prohibited the so-called promotion of homosexuality. In 2001 we produced the first-ever Manifesto for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People. But the Liberal Democrats didn’t stop there, we proposed civil partnerships at a time when many opposed them. And in 2013, the Same Sex Marriage Act was introduced because of the hard work of Lynne Featherstone in coalition government.

Thank you to the Liberal Democrats for changing the law so we could get married.

It’s difficult the overstate the impact of this act for same-sex couples. Thousands have been able to get married and our unions now given equal worth and equal respect as mixed-sex couples. This would not have been possible without the Liberal Democrats.

It’s clear to both of us that only one party will stand up for absolute equality, without exception; Liberal Democrats. Liberal Democrats today are still standing up for marriage rights for trans people and standing against any new form of Section 28 bullying LGBT kids. We oppose inequality and oppression. We always have and always will. Thank you to the Liberal Democrats for changing the law so we could get married. We had to wait twenty years to get married; some of them Tory years, some of them Labour years. Without the Liberal Democrats in Government, we’d still be waiting.

The Leader – vol 6

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Brexit Latest

This week parliament moved into the uncharted territory of ‘taking back control’ from an arrogant and incompetent executive. Apart from making an unholy mess of Brexit, Ministers have operated for far too long as though the sole purpose of government is to serve the Conservative Party. The absence of a majority finally came to bite them as the Commons wrested control of the business.

What follows is a two-stage process: a ‘straw poll’ of options yesterday, followed by a definitive choice next Monday. This is a novel procedure, and according to constitutional buffs, like Bill Cash, revolutionary: bringing back unhappy precedents from the days before the Civil War and the beheading of Charles I.

Ministers have operated for far too long as though the sole purpose of government is to serve the Conservative Party

I am sure it was coincidence, but, on the same day, Theresa May announced her own political beheading (if she gets her deal through; if she doesn’t, a potentially worse fate awaits her at the hands of the Tory party – the modern political equivalent of being hung, drawn and quartered).

In the event, Parliament did not discover a majority yesterday for any of the 8 options on offer.

But doing so was never the point of the exercise. Instead the purpose was to find which of the options commanded greatest support.

Two did well: Ken Clarke’s Customs Union amendment, which also narrowly failed to get a majority, and Margaret Beckett’s amendment for a People’s Vote which at 268 got the largest number of votes in favour and comfortably more than the 242 for Theresa May’s deal when it was last tested.

What we now have to do is to achieve on Monday the basis of a cross party consensus which has the Withdrawal Agreement subject to a referendum, together with a commitment that any final deal continues a Customs Union.

This will not be music to the ears of Theresa May and much of her party. But it has to happen otherwise on April 10 an irreversible decision will be made by the EU to proceed without the UK. The EU is absolutely clear that it doesn’t want a rupture with the UK, let alone a No Deal Brexit, but time is now running out. To be precise there are two weeks left, and a clearly defined cliff edge.

Theresa May will use this real threat to try to force her deal through one more time tomorrow. She may even make a further, fourth attempt next week, if she can circumvent Speaker Bercow’s ruling on not bringing back a repeat proposition. A cynical u-turn by Brexiteer colleagues like Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg could yet see her succeed but I am more optimistic than for some time that it is our side that has serious momentum.

The march last weekend was not just a political duty but a family occasion

The optimism was fired up by the big march in London on Saturday.

It wasn’t just a political duty but a family occasion. One of my grandsons joined me at the front and managed to upstage the celebs. My other grandson appeared, for the first time, with a girlfriend (who happens to be French). And I feel further reinvigorated by the 6 million, so far, who have signed the petition to revoke Article 50 and stay within the EU, including 20% of all residents in my Twickenham constituency.

My conviction we are pursuing the right course was reinforced by a visit to Brussels last Thursday, during the European Council Meeting, when I met the liberal heads of government and heads of the various liberal parties across Europe.

Though their patience is being severely tested, there is a great warmth towards Britain and sadness that the UK is preparing to leave. Guy Verhofstadt asked me to speak to the gathering and I received the loudest applause when I mentioned that there is still every chance we could remain.

None of us know where the next few days will lead. The Prime Minister is threatening to ignore parliament: a very dangerous step for her, her party and the country. She may not survive the week.

And finally

No book recommendation this week – too busy with Brexit late nights. But I do recommend an absolutely stunning film: White Crow.

The film is the story of the brilliant Russian ballet dancer, Rudolf Nureyev, who defected to the West from the USSR in the 1960s when the Cold War was as its height. The production is clever, pacey and utterly authentic. There is some superlative acting from Ralph Fiennes, as his Russian mentor; and Adèle Exarchopoulos playing his Chilean friend Clara who helped him escape at Paris airport, and Oleg Ivenko playing Nureyev himself, who is portrayed as supremely gifted but utterly selfish on a personal level.

Having travelled to the Soviet Union a couple of times at the end of the Krushnev era, I recognised the style of the Soviet minders: weedling and threatening in equal measure; trying to inspire fear of authority in a system, Post-Stalin, already losing its capacity to terrorise. Nureyev was entirely non-political and never attempted to politicise his defection.

He just wanted to be free, artistically and personally.

Nureyev himself died (sadly as a result of AIDs) but, even for those of us who are not great enthusiasts for ballet, there is, in the film, enough to recognise one of the artistic legends of my lifetime.

The Leader – vol 6: May’s embarrassing week

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Brexit Latest

This week parliament moved into the uncharted territory of ‘taking back control’ from an arrogant and incompetent executive. Apart from making an unholy mess of Brexit, Ministers have operated for far too long as though the sole purpose of government is to serve the Conservative Party. The absence of a majority finally came to bite them as the Commons wrested control of the business.

What follows is a two-stage process: a ‘straw poll’ of options yesterday, followed by a definitive choice next Monday. This is a novel procedure, and according to constitutional buffs, like Bill Cash, revolutionary: bringing back unhappy precedents from the days before the Civil War and the beheading of Charles I.

Ministers have operated for far too long as though the sole purpose of government is to serve the Conservative Party

I am sure it was coincidence, but, on the same day, Theresa May announced her own political exit (if she gets her deal through; if she doesn’t, a potentially worse fate awaits her at the hands of the Tory party).

In the event, Parliament did not discover a majority yesterday for any of the 8 options on offer.

But doing so was never the point of the exercise. Instead the purpose was to find which of the options commanded greatest support.

Two did well: Ken Clarke’s Customs Union amendment, which also narrowly failed to get a majority, and Margaret Beckett’s amendment for a People’s Vote which at 268 got the largest number of votes in favour and comfortably more than the 242 for Theresa May’s deal when it was last tested.

What we now have to do is to achieve on Monday the basis of a cross party consensus which has the Withdrawal Agreement subject to a referendum, together with a commitment that any final deal continues a Customs Union.

This will not be music to the ears of Theresa May and much of her party. But it has to happen otherwise on April 10 an irreversible decision will be made by the EU to proceed without the UK. The EU is absolutely clear that it doesn’t want a rupture with the UK, let alone a No Deal Brexit, but time is now running out. To be precise there are two weeks left, and a clearly defined cliff edge.

Theresa May will use this real threat to try to force her deal through one more time tomorrow. She may even make a further, fourth attempt next week, if she can circumvent Speaker Bercow’s ruling on not bringing back a repeat proposition. A cynical u-turn by Brexiteer colleagues like Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg could yet see her succeed but I am more optimistic than for some time that it is our side that has serious momentum.

The march last weekend was not just a political duty but a family occasion

The optimism was fired up by the big march in London on Saturday.

It wasn’t just a political duty but a family occasion. One of my grandsons joined me at the front and managed to upstage the celebs. My other grandson appeared, for the first time, with a girlfriend (who happens to be French). And I feel further reinvigorated by the 6 million, so far, who have signed the petition to revoke Article 50 and stay within the EU, including 20% of all residents in my Twickenham constituency.

My conviction we are pursuing the right course was reinforced by a visit to Brussels last Thursday, during the European Council Meeting, when I met the liberal heads of government and heads of the various liberal parties across Europe.

Though their patience is being severely tested, there is a great warmth towards Britain and sadness that the UK is preparing to leave. Guy Verhofstadt asked me to speak to the gathering and I received the loudest applause when I mentioned that there is still every chance we could remain.

None of us know where the next few days will lead. The Prime Minister is threatening to ignore parliament: a very dangerous step for her, her party and the country. She may not survive the week.

And finally

No book recommendation this week – too busy with Brexit late nights. But I do recommend an absolutely stunning film: White Crow.

The film is the story of the brilliant Russian ballet dancer, Rudolf Nureyev, who defected to the West from the USSR in the 1960s when the Cold War was as its height. The production is clever, pacey and utterly authentic. There is some superlative acting from Ralph Fiennes, as his Russian mentor; and Adèle Exarchopoulos playing his Chilean friend Clara who helped him escape at Paris airport, and Oleg Ivenko playing Nureyev himself, who is portrayed as supremely gifted but utterly selfish on a personal level.

Having travelled to the Soviet Union a couple of times at the end of the Krushnev era, I recognised the style of the Soviet minders: weedling and threatening in equal measure; trying to inspire fear of authority in a system, Post-Stalin, already losing its capacity to terrorise. Nureyev was entirely non-political and never attempted to politicise his defection.

He just wanted to be free, artistically and personally.

Nureyev himself died (sadly as a result of AIDs) but, even for those of us who are not great enthusiasts for ballet, there is, in the film, enough to recognise one of the artistic legends of my lifetime.

Indicative Votes

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

After months of deadlock, on Monday night Parliament voted to take control of Brexit away from the Government.

Today we will be going through a process of “indicative votes”. This might be a normal way of doing things in just about any other walk of life but in Parliament it is novel and I wanted to share with you a few thoughts about how we shall approach these votes and what we want to achieve.

Our primary goal is clear – we want to build support for a people’s vote with the option to remain in the EU. On Saturday one million people marched into Parliament Square in support of that cause. Today Liberal Democrat MPs will take that cause one step further in the Commons Chamber.

We remain unanimous in our view that whichever option emerges must then be put to a people’s vote.

We shall expect Liberal Democrat MPs to support any amendment that makes this happen.

The two most important votes for us tonight will be:

  • Margaret Beckett’s amendment that calls for a people’s vote; and
  • Joanna Cherry’s amendment that would call on the government to revoke Article 50 should we reach the day before Brexit day without a deal.

All other amendments are about what sort of Brexit we should get. Liberal Democrats do not want Brexit at all! As this process emerges we shall argue that whichever option emerges should then be put to the people in a vote against the option to remain.

As I said at the start of this article the “indicative votes” are the start of a process. That process will conclude on Monday. To use a football analogy, if this were the World Cup then today would be the group matches and then Monday will be the playoffs. The most popular (or least unpopular) choices will be pitted against each other until we reach consensus.

The choice between different sorts of Brexit is an unpalatable one for Liberal Democrats. There is no good answer to the question and a wide range of views about which is the least bad. For that reason, we shall not formally ”whip” these votes and shall allow all our MPs to reach their own judgement. We remain unanimous in our view that whichever option emerges must then be put to a people’s vote.

Last Saturday over a million people took to the streets to breath new life into the case for a people’s vote. We owe it to them to make that case our primary objective. I am determined that we shall do that. We are closer to getting a people’s vote today than we have ever been. We must not allow other considerations to distract us.

14 progressive Lib Dem policies the government don’t want you to know about

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

Many of these private members’ bills simply fell off the parliamentary order paper this week – the Tory government failed to give us to debate these vital issues. Others were outright blocked. We must demand better than this broken government, distracted by their Brexit mess.

Here are our 14 progressive private members’ bills the government doesn’t want you to know about.

Cutting down plastic pollution

We need radical action to cut down on plastic pollution. Alistair Carmichael’s bill does just that.

His bill would require the government to commit to ambitious targets to reduce plastic pollution and report back on progress annually. It also aims to get rid of single use plastics by 2025.

If we are to truly confront climate change and pollution, our ambition must match the enormity of the challenge ahead.

Providing end of life care for the homeless

We must do much more to help those who are rough sleeping or homeless. That means a new approach to low cost and social housing, as well as scrapping the odious Vagrancy Act that criminalises the homeless.

It also means we do more to ensure those who are terminally ill, and living on our streets, have appropriate medical care and housing support. Ed Davey’s bill would do just that.

Ending the gender price gap

It’s a travesty that women have to pay more than men for basic products like razors when there is virtually not difference in the product. It’s just not fair.

Christine Jardine’s bill to end the gender price gap seeks to end this malpractice.

Immigration armed forces bill

Serving in our armed forces is a statement of pride and commitment, and we are lucky to have members of the Commonwealth in our military. Why, then, do we levy fees on those men and women who then seek to make Britain their home after serving?

Ed Davey doesn’t think this is right. His bill would remove the £2,389 per person fee for ex-service men and women to make Britain their home. Almost £10,000 for a family of four to move to the UK after their parent has served our country? It’s simply wrong.

Improving access to radiotherapy

A cancer diagnosis places a tremendous amount of stress on an individual or a family. It is one of the difficult things to face, and the government must do more to help.

Tim Farron’s bill seeks to make it easier for patients to access vital radiotherapy for cancer treatment, including a maximum travel time of 45 minutes for patients to travel.

Parental leave bill

Each year 54,000 women are forced out of their jobs due to pregnancy and maternity discrimination in the UK.

It’s time to get serious about workplace discrimination against new mothers and pregnant women. Jo Swinson’s bill would compel employers with over 250 people to publish information about parental leave, and their pay during the course of such leave.

We must demand better for families across Britain and tackle this fundamental injustice.

Making it easier for asylum seekers to find work

Why are we making it harder for asylum seekers to find work? For those people forced from their homes, we should be welcoming them into Britain and giving them the opportunity to start contributing to society.

That’s what Christine Jardine’s bill would do. Everyone deserves the right to work and play their part. If you agree, join our campaign here.

Gender neutral school uniforms

Gendered uniform policies send a message that boys, in their more practical clothes, should be running around and playing sport, and girls should not.

Layla Moran wants to change this. Her bill would make sure that any child can choose to wear trousers, skirts, shorts or dresses.

Recognition of Palestine

The situation in the Middle East is a humanitarian crisis, but Layla Moran’s bill would seek to redress some of the injustice faced by the Palestinian people by recognising Palestine’s statehood.

‘House of Peers’

Politics and government should reflect the society it represents. Despite this, half of our legislature retains the archaic name House of Lords.

It’s time for a change. That’s why Christine Jardine’s bill would rename the body to the House of Peers.

Giving people the final say on Brexit

Tom Brake’s bill would give the people the final say on the Brexit deal.

The government has made a complete mess of Brexit. It’s cost more, been more complicated, and taken far longer than expected. To make matters worse, Theresa May is now trying to threaten MPs into backing her deal by running down the clock. It’s a national embarrassment.

The politicians have shown they cannot fix this mess themselves. Tom Brake’s bill would give the people power over their own future through a People’s Vote.

Railways franchises

Thousands of people had their working lives made impossible due to the southern and northern rail timetable chaos in 2018.

We need to make it much easier for the government to strip companies of their franchises for poor performance, and put power over rail decision making back in the hands of local authorities. That’s what Tim Farron’s Railways (Franchises) Bill would seek to do.

Improving transport to hospitals

Tim Farron’s bill demands a full-scale review of patient journey times for elderly people across the country. For people in rural areas, accessing medical support can be a huge struggle.

We have to demand better. We need a major re-think in how older people travel to hospital appointments.

Postnatal health care check ups

New mothers can experience serious mental health challenges, but sadly we have not seen real action from the government on this issue. They are simply not doing enough to improve mental health care.

Wera Hobhouse’s bill would require routine six week National Health Service check-ups for new mothers to include mental health assessments and advice. Mental health is just as important as physical health, and our support for new mothers must reflect that.

I am SO proud of our Party

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

I am SO proud of our Party today

The fight against Brexit is not over. We showed we’re closer than ever to a People’s Vote

Alongside other pro-Europeans, we showed the fight against Brexit is not over. We showed we’re closer than ever to a People’s Vote.

There were a million people marching today with a million reasons why they want to stop Brexit – but in my speech to our huge Lib Dem contingent, I chose one: Climate Change.

With the Lib Dems, the UK set the pace for tackling Climate Change across Europe.

Because Lib Dem Ministers were at the EU table, Britain won the argument for tougher EU-wide targets to cut greenhouse gases. And by Britain leading in Europe, Europe could lead the world.

We are stronger together. Co-operation always beats petty-minded isolationism

But the climate change crisis is so serious it demands even more action, now, – across Europe and at the UN. Already natural disasters like cyclones are far worse due to the rise in sea levels. The suffering we are now seeing in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi will be repeated and repeated if we don’t act.

In these perilous times, the last thing Britain should do is turn inwards. We need to embrace Europe and the world to solve our shared challenges.

We are stronger together. Co-operation always beats petty-minded isolationism.

That’s why we marched today. That’s why we’re fighting for a People’s Vote. And whilst we’re closer than ever, we need you to be a part of our campaign. So join us today:

A Conservative MP just pleaded guilty to falsifying expenses

Vince Cable and Liberal Democrats on Europe March 2017

The Conservative MP for Brecon & Radnorshire has pleaded guilty to two charges of making a false expenses claim.

It’s likely that this will lead to either his resignation or a recall petition. This means that we could be fighting a by-election in Brecon & Radnor as early as next week! We have to be ready for this. Will you chip into our fighting fund today?

Yes, I’ll donate!

If this by-election happens, we have to win it

Brecon & Radnorshire was a Liberal Democrat held seat until 2015 – and we finished in 2nd place in the 2017 General Election.

Kirsty Williams is the Lib Dem AM for the constituency and the Welsh Cabinet Secretary for Education.

We recently selected Welsh Lib Dem leader Jane Dodds as our PPC to fight the next General Election.

She’s a great candidate – and she’s already thrown herself headfirst into winning the seat back.

I don’t need to tell you how important this is – if this by-election happens, we have to win it.

A Lib Dem win will put our party back on the Parliamentary map in Wales.

It will show that there’s an alternative to the broken two-party politics we’re seeing play out in the news every night.

It will ensure that the people of Brecon & Radnorshire have a diligent, dedicated MP working to get the best for them in Parliament.

Help us demand better for Britain. Donate today.

I’ll donate